Should we combine U.S. History I and II to have a lighter 12th grade year?

Dear Carrie

Should I combine U.S. History I and U.S. History II, so my son’s 12th grade year is lighter and he can pursue other interests?

Dear Carrie,

My son is currently doing Heart of Dakota‘s World History for 10th grade and enjoying it! Contemplating his next year, however, I’m wondering if it’s possible to combine the U.S. History I and II history portion? Our state only requires (1) credit of American History. While I’m sure the material is worth spending multiple years on, my son is anticipating a lighter course load his senior year. He wants some time to pursue other interests. If this is inadvisable, do you have any other suggestion? Thank you in advance!

Sincerely,

“Ms. Combine U.S. History I and II for a Lighter Year and to Pursue Other Interests Or Not”

Dear “Ms. Combine U.S. History I and II for a Lighter Year and to Pursue Other Interests Or Not,”

Many states require only 1 year of American History. Often that year of history does not even have to cover all of American History, making it fine from the state’s perspective to cover only a portion of American History as both the USI and USII guides do. This means that it would be fine to use either USI or USII to fulfill your state requirements. College requirements are often more rigorous than state requirements, so you may wish to check the requirements for any colleges your son may be considering before making any decisions.

I would suggest your son does U.S. History I next.

If your son is doing World History, I would be inclined to suggest he go into USI next. This will give him needed credits in Government and in American Literature, along with the required credit he needs in American History. It would also give him the needed Chemistry credit and allow him to continue along the foreign language path. In addition, he would be able to complete the New Testament Survey for Bible (after doing the Old Testament Survey in World History).

I like the options this leaves for your son’s 12th grade year.

I like that this choice leaves your options open for his senior year when he gets there. Much can change between a student’s junior and senior year. The USII guide has 1/2 less of a credit (with 6 1/2 possible credits) than the USI guide (with 7 possible credits). This makes the USII guide less time consuming than USI. The science is also lighter in USII with its astronomy/geology/paleontology focus instead of the more math-based Chemisty in USI.

I would not advise combining U.S. History I and II.

I wouldn’t advise trying to combine USI and USII for history, as it would be way too heavy both in volume and required output. You would also lose the connections by pushing through too much material too quickly. I will share that my two oldest sons truly enjoyed completing USII for their senior years. Since by the time they reach their senior year students (who have come up through HOD) have honed their reading, writing, critical thinking, and independent work skills, the senior year feels easier overall than previous years. It is a time of reaping what has been sown.

We purposefully front-load  a student’s credits the first 3 years.

At HOD, we choose to front-load a student’s credits the first three years of high school to be sure students are earning needed credits right from the beginning. This helps make the senior year less stressful and more enjoyable. From a personal standpoint, I would hesitate to miss the USII guide if at all possible, simply because there is such wonderful training for life in the Economics and Finance options, along with the apologetics course for Bible and the Speech course. The books in the literature study are not to be missed in my opinion, and the history part of the course is so helpful in understanding the times we live in today.

The science course may be a student’s last opportunity to know how to refute science that does not align with God’s Word. Simply being able to logically explain the creation-based perspective as adults when they visit museums, national parks, and planetariums makes doing the Astronomy/Geology/Paleontology course worthwhile! I pray this will help as you ponder your options! It is exciting to see students grow and mature. Congratulations on the hard work that has led to this point with your son!!

Blessings,
Carrie

 

Economics in U.S. History II

Dear Carrie

How long does U.S. History II’s Economics take, and what types of assignments go with it?

We’ve enjoyed using Heart of Dakota for a decade now. Like always about this time of year, I am starting to think about next year. I was wondering about the Economics in U.S. History II. How long does it take each day? What types of assignments go along with it? Thanks!

Sincerely,

“Ms. Please Describe Economics in U.S. History II”

Dear “Ms. Please Describe Economics in U.S. History II,”

The assignments vary with the books that the students are using. The opening 14-15 weeks have students watching Money-Wise DVD segments and doing corresponding video viewing guides, discussions, and assignments. These sessions average around 30-35 minutes daily. Occasionally, some days are 5-10 min. longer if the students are viewing a longer video and recording information. Once weekly, students read and annotate from Larry Burkett’s Money Matters for Teens. These days are shorter.

After moving through the Money-Wise DVD/guide sessions, students move on to reading Economics: A Free Market Reader and answering daily questions that pertain to the reading. Questions range from comprehension to application to research. The daily sessions hover around 25-30 minutes at that point, depending on how fast a child reads. The rest of the year will follow a similar pattern as the students move through the remaining Economics Resources.

I hope that helps!! My son truly enjoyed the Economics and Finance combination in U.S. History II. He talked with my husband almost daily about one or both of these subjects. We think it is timely for students to be studying Economics and Finance their senior year as they prepare for adult life. We couldn’t be more pleased with the connections between the two subjects. I found the study of these two subjects extremely entertaining as well as I planned them (and neither area was a love of mine previously)!

Blessings,
Carrie

P.S. For more general information about Heart of Dakota, click here!

Step into Your Future with Confidence and Conviction with U.S. History II for High School

From Our House to Yours

Prepare to step into the future with confidence and conviction with U.S. History II!

Heart of Dakota’s U.S. History II prepares soon-to-graduate high school students to courageously step into their future with confidence and conviction! U.S. History II brings America’s complete story into perspective, while still sharing the Christian foundations it was built upon. It fully prepares students to go forth into the world armed with faith and knowledge, knowing the Lord has plans to prosper them, and to give them hope and a future!

So, what credits are covered in U.S. History II?

Well, students actually can earn up to 7 full credits in U.S. History II.  Credits include the following:

  • U.S. History II (1 full credit)
  • Bible (1 full credit)
  • Economics (1/2 credit)
  • Finance (1/2 credit)
  • Speech (1/2 credit)
  • Spanish or Latin/Greek (1/2 credit)
  • English (1 full credit)
  • Math (1 full credit)
  • Science with lab (1 full credit)

This guide is written for students ages 16-18 or older. There are 4 days of plans each week, and they are all noted on a 2-page spread. Finally, students can expect to spend about 6-7 hours, 4 days a week, to complete their work.

Let’s take a closer look at the “Learning Through History” part of the plans!

The “Learning Through History” part of the plans begins with William J. Bennett’s America : The Last Best Hope Vol. II.  With expert storytelling, Bennett recounts the last century’s great wars, the rise of Communism, the struggle for for freedom, and the triumph of liberty. Next, stepping in to join Bennett’s narration is Linda Hobar, author of Mystery of History. Hobar tells the story both of the ‘wars of the world” and the “wars of ideologies.” She then moves on to modern day conflicts.  Along this chronological journey, students are asked to make Key Decisions in U.S. History. To do this, they use Great Documents in U.S. History, Great Letters in American History, and The American Testimony DVD Set 2. Similarly, Living Library readings further enhance this journey through time, making it even more memorable!

What do students do in the “Learning Through History” part of the plans?

U.S. History II contains skills that certainly help students prepare for their future post high school. Within journal entries, students analyze multiple primary source documents and take graphic organizer style notes from DVD viewings. They also write multi-paragraph narrations, interpret maps, and write supported answers to critical thinking questions regarding U.S. documents. Students analyze key decisions in U.S. History, and they write their own opinions using excerpts to support their conclusions. They also share history-related talking points and use quotations in context.  Finally, students complete assessments such as key word, summary, detailed, topic, typed opinion, persuasive, recorded, oral, and multi-paragraph written narrations, which certainly keeps the Charlotte Mason flavor of the plans intact.

Economics and Foreign Language are part of the plans too!

Economics and Foreign Language are included in the plans as well.  For Economics, students explore God’s principles for living a life of liberty, prosperity, and generosity in Money-Wise DVD viewing sessions. In Money Matters for Teens, students gain Bible-based wisdom from financial expert Larry Burkett. Next, in The Myth of the Robber Barons, students learn the difference between market entrepreneurs and political entrepreneurs. Then, students Solve the Money Mystery with “Uncle Eric” and Bluestocking Guide’s author Kathryn Daniels. Students put their newfound Economics knowledge to the test by answering “Thought Questions” about articles by noted economists in Economics: A Free Market Reader. They complete quizzes, semester tests, and a final exam in Intro to Economics. Finally, students round out the left side of the plans by completing either Spanish or Latin/Greek.

What do students do in the “Learning the Basics” part of the plans?

The “Learning the Basics” part of the plans teach essential skills that meet academic and spiritual needs. First, students learn how to share and defend their faith in I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist. Next for their devotionals, daughters partner with parents in Girl Talk, and sons partner with parents in Created for Work.  Then, students join Dave Ramsey to build a promising future with Foundations in Personal Finance.  After that, they learn to become confident speech-givers via Secrets of the Great Communicators and How to Become a Dynamic Speaker. Then, students dig into science with our Astronomy and Geology and Paleontology study and lab. Finally, students enjoy a balanced language arts program. This includes incredible Charlotte Mason-inspired British literature plans, R & S English lessons, and dictation passages. Consequently, students can expect an amazing year of learning!

In Christ,

Julie