‘Pop Back and Forth’ to Teach Multiple R & S English Levels Simultaneously

From Our House to Yours

‘Pop Back and Forth’ to Teach Multiple R & S English Levels Simultaneously

I thought I’d share how I teach multiple R & S English levels at one time! Emmett is using R & S English 5 in HOD’s Revival to Revolution, and Riley is using R & S English 8 in HOD’s USI high school. I like to have each sit at their own table in adjacent rooms, so they are not distracted by each other, but I can easily pop back and forth between them.  Emmett sits at the kitchen table, and Riley sits at the dining room table.

I start with the youngest studying his oral review questions and answers.

I start by having my younger son, Emmett, study his oral questions and answers in his R & S English teacher’s guide. He is a visual learner, and reading the questions and answers in print helps him better retain the information. Usually within a few minutes, he tells me he his ready. I then take away the guide and orally ask him the questions. He rarely misses any, but if he does, I have him study the teacher’s guide again. Then, I ask just the one he missed one more time. It is amazing to me how much better he does on reviews since we have been doing this!

I pop over to the oldest to do his oral review questions, while the youngest silently reads his lesson.

Emmett then silently reads his R & S English pupil text lesson. While Emmett is silently reading his lesson at the kitchen table, I call Riley to the dining room table. Riley studies his oral questions and answers in his R & S English teacher’s guide. When he says he is ready, I take away the teacher’s guide and orally ask him the questions. Just as I did with Emmett, if he misses any, I have him study again and ask that question one more time. After this, Riley reads his pupil text lesson silently at the dining room table.

I pop back to the youngest to orally do his lesson, while the oldest silently reads his lesson.

About this time, Emmett is done silently reading his lesson. So, I pop back to the kitchen table. We then work through the lesson together orally. I often have him take a few minutes to ‘study’ and ‘think through’ his answers for a section before asking him to orally answer. It is amazing how much better he does then! Emmett can rush and be a bit of a ‘blurter’ otherwise. Having him study a section and think through his answers prior to answering them orally has helped him go from answering many questions wrong to answering almost every question right! As we are working orally through the lesson, I look ahead and mentally note which written part I want to assign him to write the answers for in his notebook.

I pop back to the oldest to orally do his lesson, while the youngest writes the section I’ve assigned in his notebook.

We keep moving through the lesson orally until Riley calls out to say he’s done reading. If Emmett and I get to the section I want him to write before Riley calls out to me, I skip the section I want him to write, and finish out the rest orally. Whenever Riley calls out to let me know he is done reading though, I quickly finish the section Emmett and I are orally doing and then have Emmett do the written section I chose for him to write in his notebook. While Emmett is independently doing his assigned written section, I pop back over to Riley. We work through his lesson orally. Whenever Emmett calls out he is done with his written section, I quickly finish the section Riley and I are orally doing and then have Riley look ahead to choose a written section to do in his notebook.

I pop back to the youngest to correct his written work and orally finish his lesson, while the oldest does his written work, and then finish out orally with the oldest.

I pop back to the kitchen table. Using the teacher’s guide, I correct Emmett’s written work and assign a grade for it. We then work through any remaining questions orally. Emmett is done, so I pop back to Riley’s dining room table. I correct Riley’s written work and assign a grade for it. We then work through any remaining questions orally. Voila! Both are now done with grammar, and in a fraction of the time it used to take me to teach multiple levels!  Hooray!  I know it sounds chaotic to pop back and forth, but it isn’t.  It works great and is a real time saver! Maybe you’d like to give it a try!

In Christ,

Julie

 

 

Do you have a child who needs to transition to smaller handwriting?

Teaching Tip

Do you have a child who needs to transition to smaller handwriting?

My tip today deals with kiddos who are maturing manuscript or cursive sentence writers. A good handwriting goal for students in grades 2-4 is to work toward writing smaller as they write on paper.

How can you encourage your child to write smaller on lined paper?

There are a few easy ways to encourage your child in the transition to smaller handwriting. One easy way is to have your child switch from special handwriting paper with big lines to regular, wide-lined notebook paper. To aid your child in copying on wide-lined paper, draw a light dotted pencil line in the middle of each wide line. The dotted line will give your child a midpoint guide on each line for lower case letters. This simple change will help your child automatically begin to shrink his/her writing to fit in the space

How can you help your child transition to writing smaller on blank paper?

In Bigger Hearts, Preparing Hearts, and Creation to Christ children are transitioning to writing on blank paper or in blank boxes in a student notebook. You can help shrink your child’s writing by drawing 1/2″ lines in pencil in the assigned blank areas of the page. This will guide your child to write smaller to stay within the lines.

After smaller handwriting has become a habit, your child will no longer need guide lines.

Once writing smaller has become a habit for your child, you can eventually stop including guide lines. Urging your child toward smaller handwriting is easy to do with these simple tips! Give these tips a try and see what you think!

Blessings,
Carrie

MTMM for High School: Science Path Questions

Pondering Placement for High School Science

MTMM for High School: Science Path Questions

We are using HOD’s Revival to Revolution this year. My son will be using MTMM for 9th grade this coming year. He said he would like to do something different for science this year than chemistry. So, we were thinking of having him do biology. In doing this, would we need to use the health resources from WH as well? I know you said this was a good pairing science-wise. I really don’t want things to become disjointed for him. He reads and comprehends very well above his level, and he will turn 15 shortly. We will not make it through all the guides. So, as we go through and incorporate things one year, this may open up room for something else another year. At the same time, we don’t want to weigh him down with too much. Would adding the health with the biology in MTMM be too heavy?

Sincerely,

“Ms. Please Help with High School Science Decisions”

Dear “Ms. Please Help with High School Science Decisions,”

As you look at your son’s year and your decision to use MTMM for his freshman year, we want to take care not to switch out so many things and add so much that MTMM actually becomes more difficult and heavy than simply using World Geography for his freshman year. With that in mind, I would lean toward using as much of MTMM as written.

For your son’s high school science, I’d add to the MTMM science and leave the WG, WH, and USI high school science plans intact.

The science in MTMM is actually a pretty good mix of chemistry, physics, and biology with some geology thrown into the mix through the study of fossils. It is a great year of study and quite different than the science the students have just come out of in Rev2Rev. I would encourage your son to use the science in MTMM as written and add either the Chemistry 101, Biology 101, or Physics 101 dvds on his free 5th day – choosing whichever set best suits his fancy. I would leave the sciences in World Geography, World History, and US1 intact for the time when he arrives at those guides. By the time he gets to his senior year, and is likely using US1, we can look more deeply at his interests and plan his science for that year accordingly

High School Literature for MTMM

For literature, I would either use DITHR Level 6/7/8 with the 7/8 DITHR Boy set, or he could instead use the boy literature set from World Geography along with DITHR 6/7/8 Student Book (and then the following year do only the BJU lit along with World Geography, thus lightening his load for literature for the World Geography year). If you did use the Boy Lit set from World Geography with DITHR, you would just plug each of these books into whatever DITHR genre fits best and teach your way through the DITHR unit with the book. I would stay with WWTB Vol. II as scheduled in MTMM for composition and do the Rod and Staff English as scheduled in MTMM. This combination will give him one full credit in lit/comp.

High School Economics for MTMM

For Economics, he could either add the Economics study from US2, or he could simply do what is scheduled within MTMM and wait to do Economics until his senior year of high school. Either option would work.

High School Foreign Language for MTMM

I would plan to add Getting Started with Spanish from the World Geography guide, which you can do without needing the World Geography guide. Simply have him do one lesson a day of Getting Started with Spanish. This will earn him 1/2 credit in Spanish I.

High School Credits for MTMM

I would leave the rest of MTMM as written. His credits then would be as follows:
1 credit in U.S. History II
1 credit in English (including lit, comp, and grammar)
1 credit in Science with Lab
1/2 credit in Spanish I
1/2 credit in Economics (if you add the study from US2 and 1 full credit if you also do the Farmer’s Market)
1 credit in Math (Algebra I or above)
1/2 credit in Bible (up to one full credit if he is also doing Bible reading outside of school time)
1/2 credit in Fine Arts: Drawing from Nature (if he adds additional nature journal entries during the week or during the summer)

Looking Ahead 

Hope this helps! Just for reference, for each year of HOD high school study once he reaches the official high school guides, your son will earn 6 1/2 to 7 credits each year. So, you can see the credits he will be earning through MTMM will be comparable. Most states require between 18-24 credits to graduate with this requirement differing from state to state.

Blessings,
Carrie

The older overshadows the younger – continue to combine? Or, separate?

Dear Carrie

Should I separate or combine, when the older overshadows the younger?

I’ve been looking over the first week of HOD’s Preparing Hearts plans. (They look wonderful!)  I am wondering how to do the Independent sections with two kids? Would they work on the science readings, experiments, and notebooking together? Or, would you have one do the Independent History reading, while the other is working on Science, and then switch? I also have another question for you. My older son overshadows the younger one frequently. They are only a year apart in age but more like 2 years apart developmentally. I have often thought about separating them. Part of me would like to start Preparing in the fall with my 10-year-old and continue with Bigger for my 8-year-old. But, then I will also have a 5-year-old in Little Hearts. How hard would it be to do three programs? I don’t love the ‘overshadowing’ feeling. Or, do you have any other ideas?

Sincerely,

“Ms. Please Help Me Decide How to Deal with Overshadowing”

Dear “Ms. Please Help Me Decide How to Deal with Overshadowing,”

I understand that an older child constantly overshadowing a younger child can be difficult. If you choose to keep your children combined, I’d probably have them do the experiments together but schedule the rest to be done separately. But, you could easily do their independent work the other way you described as well.  As far as your question about separating or combining, I pictured my own sons when you mentioned the older ‘overshadowing’ the younger. My older son would often overshadow my younger son if they did their readings and assignments together.

It really depends on how independent your older son is.

In this situation, it really depends on how independent your older son is. My oldest is independent and strong-willed. He’s always very much enjoyed being in charge of his learning (with me being the helper). From a young age, the more of his day he could take over on his own, the happier he was. So, if this is the case with your older son, you could use the first 9 weeks of the school year to “train him” to use the Preparing Hearts guide very independently. You could be doing Bigger and Little Hearts at half-speed during this “training period.” After the training is over, you could bump Bigger Hearts to full-speed, while still keeping Little Hearts at half-speed. Once you hit your stride with Preparing and Bigger, you could then bump up Little Hearts to full-speed. This would be one way to deal proactively with the overshadowing.

I’d require a high standard of work from your oldest during this “training period.”

If you choose to do this, during the “training period,” I’d require a very high standard of work from your oldest. I’d set the timer and keep him on schedule. I would also schedule the places where he is to do his work, as well as when he is to do his work. Have him check off his items and hand them all in. Go over the directions in each box with him as you check his work to make sure he followed them all. This will teach him to read directions carefully.

What You’d Each Still Be Doing

In Preparing, you would still be scheduling some time to do the questioning and discussions scheduled in the Reading About History box. However, he could be doing the readings himself. You would be doing the Bible discussion of the Psalms scheduled on Days 1-2  but he’d be independent on Days 3-4).  You’d also be teaching the Charlotte Mason-style poetry lesson, and most likely doing the Storytime read-alouds. But, the rest of the guide can really be done independently at his age. I did still teach the grammar lesson to my oldest, dictate his passages for spelling, and do the DITHR discussions together on alternating days as scheduled. Either option would work! This is just some food for thought on one way to overcome the overshadowing for good!

Blessings,
Carrie

 

 

How HOD Projects Decorate and Adorn Our Home

From Our House to Yours

How HOD Projects Decorate and Adorn Our Home

In Heart of Dakota, students get to respond to their Charlotte Mason living books’ readings in all sorts of ways. Through the years, our sons have especially enjoyed responding to their readings with their history projects. While we cannot keep all of the projects, they have used many of them to decorate their bedrooms. Even more of their history projects adorn the rest of our home. Each time we walk through the house, we take a trip down memory lane. As our sons lay their heads down to sleep, they do so in the company of many of their Heart of Dakota history projects. This blog is dedicated to a few of those special decorations!

The Preparing Hearts for His Glory Timeline Adorned Our Doors

Each of our sons loved making the Preparing Hearts for His Glory staircase timeline. First, Wyatt’s timeline adorned our left closet door in our entry. Then, Riley’s timeline adorned our right closet door in our entry. When it came to Emmett, I remember him sadly saying he didn’t have any place for his timeline because both entry closet doors were taken! When I told Emmett he could hang his timeline on his bedroom door, he beamed! The timelines adorned those doors for a very long time and were a ready reference for the chronology of major historical events.

The “What does your name mean?” Project Adorned the Inside of Our Sons’ Bedroom Doors

Each of our sons enjoyed looking up what his name meant for a history project. After they wrote what their names meant, they drew small pictures around it to describe themselves. These namesake projects adorned the inside of their bedroom doors for many years. I loved that they could see why we chose each of their names! What a neat project!

Cinnamon Fish with Scripture Hang from Our Sons’ Doorknobs

Our sons enjoyed making their cinnamon fish project. I love the Scripture they wrote and glued to their fish. We also all love the cinnamon scent we catch a whiff of every time we open and close their doors.  These fish adorned their doors by hanging from their doorknobs until they finally crumbled.  We all got years of enjoyment out of them! Just when one child’s fish would break, our next son was in that guide and making a new fish for his door!

Favorite recipes adorn the inside of our kitchen cabinet doors!

They say the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach! I think this is also often the way to a boy’s heart! Our sons have loved making all of the recipes in Heart of Dakota’s history projects. Not to mention, our entire family has loved eating them! In fact, we love many of them so much that the boys copy the recipes and hang them on the inside of our kitchen cabinets. Cornbread, cookies, pastries, quick breads began to overtake our inside cabinet doors until they decided to make their own recipe binder of them. What delicious recipes!!!

Other Memorable Heart of Dakota ‘Decorations’

Our house is adorned by so many memorable Heart of Dakota decorations. Headpieces and helmets hang from bedposts. Cacti adorns dressers, and pottery is a holder for morning vitamins. Posters hang on walls, and the ‘armor of the Lord’ adorns stuffed animals. Portfolios of watercolor paintings and poetry copywork line our shelves as keepsake pieces. But above all, my favorite keepsakes are my children’s Bibles and Common Place Books. Highlighted Scriptures memorized through the years in their Bibles continue to encourage them to hide the Word in their hearts. Common Place Book scriptures and quotes keep meaningful thoughts at the ready for perusing at any time. Many Heart of Dakota things adorn and decorate our home.  I hope some of them reside in your homes for a time as well – until fresh ones take their place.

In Christ,
Julie