5 1/2 Year Old Unable to Answer Storytime Questions for Reddy Fox

Dear Carrie

My 5 1/2 year old doesn’t seem to be able to answer the Storytime questions for Reddy Fox. What should I do?

Dear Carrie,

I am doing Little Hearts for His Glory with my 5 1/2 year old daughter. Everything is going well except for Storytime. She is wiggly while I read Reddy Fox. She doesn’t seem to be comprehending any of it. She cannot answer any of the questions. Even if I read a sentence 3 times and ask a simple question about that sentence, she cannot answer it. She LOVES it when I read her storybooks with colorful pictures. Maybe I should just start letting her pick out easier books?  Then I could just come up with questions for her? Is there a way I could find out her level of comprehension?

I can keep reading Reddy Fox to her, but I don’t think she is getting anything from it. Motor skill wise – she has no problems. Reading wise she is flying through phonics and sounding out words and reading short sentences. She just doesn’t seem to be able to answer the Storytime questions for Reddy Fox. So, what should I do? Thanks for any suggestions!

Sincerely,

“Ms. Please Help My 5 1/2 Learn to Answer Storytime Questions for Reddy Fox”

Dear “Ms. Please Help My 5 1/2 Learn to Answer Storytime Questions for Reddy Fox,”

I’m so glad you are getting a chance to use and enjoy LHFHG!  We have fond memories of using LHFHG with our own four sons.  In answer to your question, I would encourage you to continue reading Reddy Fox and doing the follow-up activities. It is no surprise that your little honey is struggling with it since she is used to colorful picture books instead.

The Storytime books were chosen to transition your child to listening to longer chapter books.

The books within the Storytime box of LHFHG are not meant to be picture books but were instead chosen to transition your child to listening to longer chapter book style readings. This will be a needed skill as your child heads into Beyond Little Hearts. Listening to chapter book style readings is a skill that takes time to learn, so we would not expect your daughter to do well with this skill at first. However, if you downshift to reading colorful picture books instead, it will be a skill that your daughter will not acquire this year at all.

Storytime readings and follow-ups are meant to be short and reading them without stopping helps the child retain the flow of the story.

With this in mind, I would encourage you to continue doing the Storytime plans as written for 9 weeks. The Storytime readings are meant to be short and the follow-up are meant to be short too. As you read, do not stop to reread or to explain the readings. Instead just read the scheduled pages straight through. This is because stopping and rereading makes a child lose the flow of the story. It also decreases the attention the child gives to a single reading. The habit of attention is another habit we are working to cultivate through Storytime.

Feel free to jump in and cheerfully help with the follow-ups as needed.

After the readings, if your daughter is unable to do the follow-ups, jump in and help her as needed, making sure to keep the follow-ups short and sweet too! Over the next 9 weeks, as long as you remain positive and cheerful about this area, I think you will be truly surprised at the progress your child makes.

I would find it surprising if she were flying through everything easily.

If she were flying through everything in LHFHG easily, it would be surprising! Instead, we have skills she needs to gain throughout this guide and gaining skills takes time, practice, and patience! I’d love to have you share an update in 9 weeks to see how she’s doing if you get a chance!

Blessings,
Carrie

Update 9 Weeks Later:

I wanted to give an update on my daughter’s progress with her comprehension of the Burgess books. We’ve now finished Reddy Fox, The Adventures of Peter Cottontail, and are within a few days of completing The Adventures of Danny Meadow Mouse. She enjoys Storytime very much, listens attentively and is able to answer most questions at the end of the reading. I am thrilled with her progress and so thankful that we continued as directed! Thanks for all the support! WE LOVE HOD!!!! :D :) :) :) I can honestly say I don’t think we would be able to homeschool without it. I sincerely thank you again!

Sincerely,

“Ms. Loving My 5 1/2 Year Old’s Storytime Answers Now”

 

 

 

Try the repeating method for “Rhymes in Motion”

Teaching Tip:

Do you have a child doing Little Hands to Heaven or Little Hearts for His Glory?

If you have kiddos doing either Little Hands to Heaven or Little Hearts for His Glory, today’s teaching tip is for you! It’s a simple tip, but one that makes the “Rhymes in Motion” go more smoothly with your little ones!

What is one helpful tip when you begin a new “Rhymes in Motion?”

Here is one helpful tip for beginning a new “Rhymes in Motion.” Say the rhyme and do the motions one line at a time, with your child repeating each line right after you.

What does the repeating method look like on Day 1 of the rhyme?

For example, on Day 1 of the rhyme, you will say and perform line one of the rhyme. Then, your child will repeat line one with the motions. Next, you will move on to line two, saying and demonstrating the line. Then, your child will repeat line two with the motions. Continue on through the rhyme this way to make sure your child is getting the words and motions.

How does the repeating method differ on Day 2?

At our house, we usually continue to use the repeating method on the second day too. However, at the end of the rhyme on day two, we also do the whole rhyme once more in unison.

What are the benefits of doing the rhymes this way?

Usually after two days of repeating each line after you, kiddos are more sure of the words and motions. Then, they are ready to do the rhyme in unison with you in the coming days. The repeating method is also great for making sure your child is participating and has the words down! Try this method at the beginning of a new rhyme and see what you think!

Blessings,
Carrie

PS: For more information on how “Rhymes in Motion” help kids’ skills develop, check out this blog article here:

What are the benefits of the Rhymes in Motion?

Indomitable: The Faith and Principles of Theodore Roosevelt

History with Heart of Dakota

Who was Theodore Roosevelt?

“The problem with meeting Roosevelt face to face is that you have to go in hating him an awful lot not to come out liking him even more.” – unknown political opponent of Roosevelt’s (Grant 137)

When it comes to American heroes, few accomplished as much as Theodore Roosevelt did in his lifetime. Over nearly 61 years, Theodore Roosevelt…

…the list of his accomplishments goes on and would be worthy of their own blog post. However, today I am going to focus on what fueled all these exploits: Theodore Roosevelt’s indomitable spirit, his principles, and his faith.

An indomitable spirit

“He was forever defying the odds, defying all reason, defying the very physical realities of life in this poor fallen world.” – biographer George Grant (31)

Theodore Roosevelt never had it easy in life. Although many people think of him as being “fit as a Bull Moose,” (Grant 29) as a young boy, he suffered from severe asthma. “I was a sickly, delicate boy,” he would later recall. “[I] suffered much from asthma, and frequently had to be taken away on trips to find a place where I could breathe.” (Grant 32) Concerned that Theodore might live his whole life an invalid, his father told him, “Theodore, you have the mind but you have not the body. And without the body the mind cannot go as far as it should. You must make your body. It is hard drudgery to make one’s body, but I know you will do it.” (Grant 34) Theodore’s response was characteristic: “I’ll make my body. By heaven, I will.” (Grant 35)

Principles of a leader

“Right is right and wrong is wrong. Woe be unto the man who shies away from the battle for justice and righteousness simply because the minions of injustice and unrighteousness are arrayed against him.” – Theodore Roosevelt (Grant 113)

One thing that stands out about Theodore Roosevelt is his unflinching dedication to principles. The circumstances of his life varied wildly – from frontiersman to American President. However, the way he conducted his life never changed. He treated each person with genuine interest, regardless of their race or cultural standing. Also, although he believed in peace, he was willing to fight for worthwhile causes. “I abhor unjust war,” he once commented. “I abhor injustice and bullying by the strong at the expense of the weak, whether among nations or individuals. I abhor violence and bloodshed. But it takes strength to put a stop to abhorrent things.” (Grant 129)

Because of his unwillingness to advocate peace at any price, some critics labeled him a “warmonger.” Nonetheless, although Roosevelt built up America’s military might, his two terms as president were “among the most peaceful and harmonious in all of American history.” (Grant 128)

Christian faith

“Walk humbly; you will do so if you study the life and teachings of the Savior, walking in His steps.” – Theodore Roosevelt (Grant 186)

Unlike some historical figures, there is no doubt as to whether or not Theodore Roosevelt was a Christian. He once said, “A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” (Grant 167) His own life proved this to be correct. The principles he lived by owed their roots to none other than the Bible. For Theodore, the Bible contained truths that deserved to be lived out, whether he was enacting public policy or capturing boat thieves in the Dakota territories. “Every thinking man…” he argued, “realizes that the teachings of the Bible are so interwoven and entwined with our whole civic and social life that it would be literally impossible for us to figure ourselves what that life would be if these standards were removed.” (Grant 168)

A legacy worth carrying on

“Before a man can discipline other men, he must demonstrate his ability to discipline himself. Before he may be allowed the command of commission, he must evidence command of character. Look then to the work of his hands. Hear the words of his mouth. By his fruit you shall know him.”  – Theodore Roosevelt (Grant 163)

As I studied to write this blog post, I was struck by how practical Roosevelt’s principles still are today. We all have people who look up to us in some way, shape, or form. From Roosevelt’s dedication to leading by example, we can learn how to better influence those people. We all fear failure sometimes. To us, Roosevelt says, “There is no disgrace in a failure, only in a failure to try.” (Grant 142)

Finally, there are times – especially when raising a family – that we feel insignificant when we consider our personal successes. After a lifetime of personal success, Roosevelt tells us, “No other success in life – not being President, or being wealthy, or going to college, or anything else – comes up to the success of the man and woman who can feel that they have done their duty and that their children and grandchildren rise up to call them blessed.” (Grant 91)

In a day and age when relativism and narcissism rules, we would do well to emulate Roosevelt’s solid faith and selflessness. More importantly, Roosevelt’s example should cause us to look up and see the Savior that he so loved. In the end, just as it was with Roosevelt, so it is with us; in Christ alone can we find the strength to live with indomitable greatness.

Which HOD guides can you find Theodore Roosevelt in?

You can find Theodore Roosevelt in several of Heart of Dakota’s guides! He can be found in Little Hearts for His Glory, Missions to Modern Marvels, and US History II. You can also find a more in-depth study of him in George Grant’s excellent book The Courage and Character of Theodore Roosevelt, which students read in the Boy Living Library package in US History II.

Bibliography

Grant, G. The Courage and Character of Theodore Roosevelt. (Cumberland House Publishing Inc., 2005).

 

PS: Want a closer look at Theodore Roosevelt’s childhood and homeschooling? Have a look at this excellent video playlist by Notgrass History

A defined space helps your little ones listen better.

Teaching Tip 

A defined space helps your little ones listen better.

Do you have little ones with whom you’re doing school? If so, it really helps to define the space in which they need to sit and listen while you read.

What is a simple defined space for a 2-4 year old?

When my little ones were between the ages of 2-4, I usually had them sit on my lap.  Then, I held the Bible in front of us to read the story for Little Hands to Heaven. If you have a child who is a “wild wiggler” and doesn’t sit well on your lap, then move on to my next suggestion!

What can you use as a defined space if you have a “wild wiggler” or multiple little ones?

If you have a “wild wiggler” or multiple little ones, use carpet pieces or large, foam floor puzzle squares to define space instead.  These pieces or squares can be used to delineate the spot where each child should sit.  This becomes the defined space in which your child needs to remain during the Little Hand’s Bible reading. As you read, hold the book up beside you with the pictures facing your child.  Read from the side, so you can show the pictures as you read.

What is a simple defined space for a 5-6 year old?

For my Little Hearts for His Glory kiddos, I move to sitting on the couch.  I “anchor” my child beside me with my arm around him/her while I read. If you have two kiddos doing Little Hearts, it works well to anchor one child on either side of you!

Try defining your child’s space today, and see if your reading time goes better.

While these sound like simple suggestions, having defined boundaries for your child during reading time can make a big difference! Try it today, and see what you think!

Blessings,
Carrie

What are the benefits of the Rhymes in Motion?

Dear Carrie

What are the benefits of Little Hearts for His Glory’s Rhymes in Motion?

Dear Carrie,

I have a very crunched school year schedule with my kids. My almost 6 year old LOVES Heart of Dakota, and I’m committed to taking the time to do it with her each day. I intuitively know that the Rhymes in Motion part is worth the time, but I’m wondering if you can explain the specific benefits of that portion. (I think it will help me be faithful to do them even on the busy days!) Thank you!

Sincerely,

“Ms. Please Explain the Benefits of the Rhymes in Motion”

Dear “Ms. Please Explain the Benefits of the Rhymes in Motion,”

I am so glad that you will get a chance to use Little Hearts for His Glory! We have loved it with our own boys, so we pray it may be a blessing to your family as well.

The rhymes in motion are written to integrate the left and right side of the brain. Saying the words and doing the motions call on different parts of the brain. As kiddos say the words and do the motions at the same time, the two sides of the brain are working together. Developing pathways between the two sides of the brain is especially important for kiddos in LHFHG, as they are getting ready to read. So, I highly encourage you to do the rhymes in motion. Think of it as fun and easy brain integration therapy and reading readiness help all rolled into one!

As an additional bonus, the motions within the rhymes are also calling upon gross motor skills that are needing to be developed at this stage too. So, take the 5 minutes to do the rhymes. It is worth it!

Blessings,
Carrie

Another Homeschool Mom’s Response to Carrie’s Response

I knew you would have an amazing answer for her, Carrie!  I’d like to encourage you, Carrie, and “Ms. Please Explain the Benefits of the Rhymes in Motion” that there are even more benefits than those! I love that it teaches that school can be fun! It gets them participating in the rhyme and rhythm of language (other pre-reading skills – phonemic awareness is so huge that it was tested in 1st graders at the beginning of the school year when I worked as an ASL interpreter/tutor before our first was born).

There is also some great knowledge in some of those; my 4yo can almost recite the months of the year because she did the Rhymes in Motion with her brothers (and they loved being allowed to do a somersault on their birth month!). Thanks for the question “Ms. Please Explain the Benefits of the Rhymes in Motion!” It’s always interesting to put all the skills learned from one little subject into “education speak” and realize how integrated all the subjects and skills are!