Don’t interrupt the flow of the reading.

Red cloth heart in front of a blue-tinted bark background. Text on the left reads: "Don't interrupt the flow of the reading."

Sharing is caring!

Teaching Tip:

What is a “living book”?

Heart of Dakota’s curriculum is full of living books. Each living book is typically written by a single author who is very passionate about his/her topic. These books stand out for their conversational, narrative style and their ability to make almost any subject come to life. Living books are read in smaller segments slowly over time to allow your students to “live” with the books.

As you read aloud a living book, don’t pause during the reading to explain or question.

In a Charlotte Mason style living book reading, it is important not to stop and explain or question during the reading. You may be tempted to define difficult words, explain what is happening, or question your child to be sure he/she is understanding. While you may think you’re helping your child comprehend better by doing these things, you really aren’t!

Interrupting the flow of the reading makes it more difficult for the child to comprehend and make connections.

Charlotte Mason says that stopping during a reading to explain or question actually interrupts the flow of the reading. This makes it more difficult for the child to comprehend and make his/her own connections. So, whenever you feel the urge to pause during the reading to “help” your child, resist the urge and read on!

Reading without interruption, helps develop the habit of attention.

As your child learns to attend to a single reading, your child will be developing the habit of attention. This is a much needed habit to cultivate and isn’t one that occurs naturally in all kiddos. Try making a point not to interrupt the reading and see if your child eventually begins to attend better. I know I have been pleasantly surprised with my own boys when I tried this essential step when reading aloud!

Blessings,
Carrie

PS: Want to see more reasons why we love living books at Heart of Dakota? Have a look at this blog post here!

Better Beloved Living Books Instead of Less Loved Dry Textbooks

Sharing is caring!

3 thoughts on “Don’t interrupt the flow of the reading.”

  1. Thank you for sharing this! I am guilty of interrupting during reading to explain or define a word I assume my children might not know. I will definitely stop interrupting our readings and keep the flow going! However, my children are big interrupters during readings, as well. Is this something I should discourage or is it okay when they’re the ones talking? Often it is something from the story that reminds them of something else, or perhaps a question about the story, but there are times when their comment has nothing to do with the reading.

    1. This is a good question! Charlotte Mason would say save comments and questions until later. Interrupting the flow of the story takes away from the storytelling style of the author, from making real connections that are memorable, and from comprehending the story more fully. Oral narration or written narration should be the first response to the reading, if they are assigned as a follow-up. Ironically, I just saw an example of this during lunch today! My oldest son was telling a story. He started, and someone interrupted to ask something about the soup I made. My oldest son tried continuing on with the story, but the doorbell rang with a package being delivered. Once again he tried going on with the story, but another person interrupted to ask if the story was related to another story, etc. Oh my goodness! I was exhausted trying to follow the story! I finally asked Wyatt to start his story over, and I then asked everyone to listen without interrupting and to save their comments and questions until the end. We all understood it much better then!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.