Don’t skip the thought bubbles in the Singapore math textbook.

Teaching Tip:

With Singapore math, how do you know what to emphasize each day?

If you are using Singapore math, it can be a bit confusing sometimes to know what to emphasize. Typically there is one main concept for each day of plans. So, how do you decipher what that concept is? Here is one tip that we have found helpful.

Don’t skip the thought bubbles in the Singapore math textbook.

The “word bubbles” or “thinking bubbles” in each textbook lesson are very important. These bubbles are drawn next to children in the textbook to show what they are thinking. The children are sharing the thinking process your child is to go through as he/she solves the problems in the lesson. Many times this process is a bit different than the way you learned to do problems like these.

The Singapore method of thinking is found within the word bubbles.

It is worth the extra time it takes to decipher the process the thinking bubble is showing. This is because the Singapore method is “talked through” in the thinking bubble. So, read the thought bubbles aloud as you go over the textbook lesson with your child. Help your child discover the process being described in the bubble, and then apply it in the lesson’s problems.

If you haven’t been paying attention to the thought bubbles in the textbook, now is a good time to start!

So, if you haven’t been paying attention to the word or thought bubbles in the textbook up until now, you may want to start. I didn’t notice how important these were until we went up higher and higher in the Singapore Primary math levels. When my next little ones started Singapore though, I emphasized these from the beginning! Try it and see what a difference it makes over time.

Blessings,
Carrie

Are you doing the daily oral drill in Rod and Staff English?

Teaching Tip:

Are you doing the daily oral drill in Rod and Staff English?

If you’ve been neglecting the oral drill in English, I would encourage you start making it a part of your routine. The oral drill mainly begins in the Rod and Staff Teacher’s Guide in English 3. It is included in each guide after that. The drill reviews concepts that were taught previously. Its purpose is to cement new concepts and to keep old concepts fresh in your students’ minds.

Don’t skip the daily oral drill in Rod and Staff English.

The daily oral drill at the beginning of each lesson is truly an integral part of the lesson! It is a short daily drill that reaps big rewards. While you may be tempted to skip the oral drill, I would encourage you to think again! In the long run, the daily drill is time well-spent. Kiddos remember what they have learned much better simply due to the oral drill. It really makes a difference over time!

Try doing the daily oral drill at the beginning of your English lessons.

Give the oral drill a try. Don’t be surprised if your students can’t answer all of the oral drill right away. Be ready to help with a quick nudge if needed. Don’t drag the oral drill out, or turn it into a review lesson. Simply move through the drill giving hints and help as needed. See if you notice better retention in your students over time!

Blessings,
Carrie

PS: Want more tips on how to achieve success with Rod and Staff English? Have a look at this article:

How can you achieve success with Rod and Staff English?

Do you have trouble getting the evening meal together?

Teaching Tip: 

Do you have trouble getting the evening meal together?

Do you have trouble getting the evening meal together, when school and laundry seem to take up much of the day? I have trouble if I don’t have a plan in place for getting the evening meal on the table. So, here is my plan for avoiding the “what shall we have for dinner” panic!

Once a week, make a list of evening meals for each day of the upcoming week.

On Friday, I make a list of evening meals for the week. I list the days of the week on a sticky note. Then, I list the meal including side dishes for each day. I make the list in pencil, so I can change the day for the meal if needed. I always plan one easy meal my hubby or older sons can make for nights when I might be gone. It works best to make the list of meals for the week prior to making the grocery list.

Place all needed recipes for the week in an envelope attached to a kitchen cabinet.

I place all needed recipes for the week in an envelope attached to my kitchen cabinet. This way, I can easily refer to my recipes to see what to add to my grocery list. I also have easy access to the needed recipes as I am cooking or baking. As the week progresses, I love knowing that I have the ingredients for what I am planning to make! Even though it takes me a couple of hours on Friday afternoon, it is worth it to get organized for the week.

Place the list of meals on the refrigerator door.

I place the note with the list of meals for the week on the refrigerator door. This makes it easy for me to see what I am making each day. My boys also can easily see what is for dinner…which they love! This quick reference also helps me see what I could prepare ahead for the evening meal.

Lunch time is a great time to do a little dinner preparation.

My kiddos head outside for their recess after lunch. I find this to be a great time to get a bit of my dinner prep underway. If the evening meal has a crock pot part, I put it in during this time. If it isn’t a crock pot type meal, I might scrub potatoes or cut up needed veggies or fruit. Or, I might put ingredients in my bread maker or bake a batch of muffins during this time. I just make sure that the cooking prep doesn’t exceed my kiddos recess time. Otherwise, I find it hard to return to teaching after recess. By getting a bit of dinner prep out of the way, I have an easier time when the evening meal arrives.

Try planning ahead for a week and see what you think!

Planning ahead has become essential for me in feeding our family. As our 4 boys are growing, they are really getting to be big eaters! This makes the evening meal an important one in their eyes. Try planning ahead for a week and see if it helps you too!

Blessings,
Carrie

A streamlined lunch is a huge help in the homeschool day

Are you tempted to hibernate during this winter season?

Teaching Tip:

Are you tempted to hibernate during this winter season?

This time of year in South Dakota can really be a time when we’re tempted to be on the couch and hibernate! However, with 4 boys in our family, movement is a necessity.

A scheduled recess after lunch gets the kids moving.

We’ve found that it really helps to have a scheduled recess right after lunch. This works well because lunch is a time when we are all sitting down together for a scheduled break already.

Recess can be outdoors.

If we are heading outside, lunchtime is usually the warmest part of the day. So, after lunch is an ideal time to head outside. When our boys were younger, we told them unless it was raining, they would be going outside for recess no matter what. This cut down on the discussion as to whether it was too cold (or in the spring/summer too hot) to be outside. We just made sure to dress appropriately for the weather.

Recess can be indoors.

As our boys have gotten older, we have also added indoor recess options. The boys play ring toss, beanbag toss, mini-basketball, bulzibucket, mini-frisbee golf, ramp shot, nerf guns, etc. Sometimes they play board games.

A recess makes the rest of the day go better.

A non-negotiable recess time really makes the rest of our day go so much better. Our boys look forward to being together for recess. Even our older boys enjoy the break from school! So, how about you? Do you make sure your kiddos have a recess break as a part of their day? Try it and see what you think!

Blessings,
Carrie

Do you have scheduled breaks in your day?

Do you have a plan for checking school work?

Teaching Tip:

Do you have a plan for checking school work?

It is a good idea to have a plan for checking school work as part of your school day. Otherwise, the work will just pile up and may never get checked!

How do you handle checking work for younger students?

At our house, with our younger kiddos, we just check their work as we go through the day. We have them make needed corrections right away. They put away their work and their books as soon as they finish. This helps keep the clutter down.

How do you handle checking work for older students?

With our older kiddos, who have more independent subjects, we needed a more organized approach to checking work. So, we assigned each student a separate place on the kitchen counter to pile his completed work. Our older kiddos hand their work in open to the page that needs checking or closed with a sticky note marking the page. Our older boys also hand in any needed answer keys from the answer key shelf for us to use in checking.

Once work is checked, what happens next?

When we check something, we mark any errors. If there are few to no errors, we give the page a star or a grade. Then, we place the checked work in a new pile in a different spot. At our house, we move work from the counter to the right of the oven to the counter to the left of the oven. This provides an easy way for our boys to see what work has been checked.

How does this method allow us to stay on top of checking?

In this way, we can check work throughout the day as time allows. Our boys can see at a glance, depending on which side of the counter something is on, if their work is checked. Before putting work away, our boys make any needed corrections. Then, they either show us the corrections or turn the work in to be checked again. This helps us stay on top of the checking and keeps clutter to a minimum. It also keeps us from skipping the checking, as the piles are there as a reminder!

Ponder your plan for checking work.

Take a few moments to ponder your plan for checking work. A new plan might really change how you feel about the clutter of school work at your house. Then, try your plan and see if it helps your day go more smoothly!

Blessings,
Carrie