A Breakthrough in Spelling: Charlotte Mason’s Method of Studied Dictation

A Breakthrough in Spelling: Charlotte Mason’s Method of Studied Dictation

Charlotte Mason’s method of studied dictation was truly a breakthrough in teaching spelling! The good news is, we can still do it today, and it only takes 5 minutes. So, just what is Charlotte Mason’s method of studied dictation? Well, to put it simply, she had children study a passage first. Then, she had the parent dictate the passage phrase by phrase, had the children repeat the phrase, and had the children write it. This was all done from a single reading, without repetition. She then had children immediately fix any errors, using the passage that was studied for help. Pretty easy, right? Well, at Heart of Dakota, we love Charlotte Mason’s method of studied dictation, and here’s why!

In studied dictation, children learn the skill of seeing correctly spelled words within the context of writing.

In studied dictation, children have to capture the whole image of a sentence or a passage in their minds. They need to look at the sentences as a whole, as well as capture the individual words and their parts. This really trains children in the habit of seeing correctly spelled words within the context of writing. After all, this is the ultimate goal of learning to spell! We want kiddos to carryover their spelling to their writing. So, practicing spelling words within the context of writing sentences just makes sense.

In studied dictation, children learn to listen carefully, which helps them strengthen auditory skills.

Studied dictation also forces kiddos to strengthen auditory skills, as they listen to the parent read the passage only once. Children learn to listen for the purpose of repeating perfectly from a single reading. Prior to writing, they then repeat back what the parent said. This strengthens the skill of holding a phrase or sentence in the mind long enough to be able to repeat it back without error and then write it.

In studied dictation, children learn to proofread their work carefully and check it with a model.

After writing the phrase or sentence, children then proofread their work before checking it against the model. This is a terrific way for children to form the habit of proofreading their written work! It truly makes good proofreaders out of kiddos over time. Last, they check their own work, which trains children in checking their work against a correctly written model. They become precise checkers with continual practice.

In studied dictation, children learn to practice immediate correction.

When children miss a passage, they mark any mistakes on the passage. They then immediately correct the mistakes on their own copy. In doing so, children practice yet another skill, which is immediate correction. Moreover, the following day when the child must repeat a passage, he/she pays much closer attention to whatever was missed the day before. This, in essence, finally causes the incorrect mental picture of a word in the mind to be rewritten or mentally corrected. The old, incorrect image is now replaced with the new, correct image. This is the very mental work that must be done in order for the poor speller to fix his/her poor spelling habits. It is also something the good speller does naturally.

Charlotte Mason had a continual focus on children NOT seeing words written incorrectly.

Charlotte Mason had a continual focus on children NOT seeing words written incorrectly. She believed the incorrect image of the word became imprinted on the mind (causing the “wrong” spelling to now “look” right)! This is why kiddos who struggle with poor spelling often have no idea whether a word is spelled correctly or not. It is because they have seen the word written incorrectly so many times that their mind can’t recognize the correct spelling – even when they try!

Charlotte Mason would not have been an advocate of spelling programs that require children to find misspelled words within passages.

Many spelling programs have a section that requires a child to find the misspelled word within a provided passage. In light of Charlotte Mason’s method of studied dictation, this type of exercise is definitely not a good idea! It actually gives the mind yet another opportunity to take a mental picture of an incorrectly spelled word! The theory for including this within a spelling program is that it is good practice for standardized tests,where kiddos will be asked to find the incorrectly spelled word. But in truth, it is training the child to focus on the misspelled word rather than on the correctly spelled words! Children who have been trained in the studied dictation method often have no trouble finding incorrectly spelled words on tests. They are too used to seeing the words spelled correctly! Incorrect words truly jump off the page… no practice needed!

Heart of Dakota and Studied Dictation

At Heart of Dakota, we love studied dictation! Starting with Bigger Hearts for His Glory, we include multiple levels of dictation passages. Though Charlotte Mason advocated dictation be taken directly from a literature passage being studied, we use the Charlotte Mason method of studied dictation while still progressing systematically through passages that gradually increase in difficulty. The dictation passages we use come from an old dictation book that was the standard for teaching spelling in bygone years!

In Closing…

In closing, through studied dictation, we teach children the skills of capturing a correct mental image of a string of words, auditorily hearing the sentence and repeating it back correctly, writing the words in the correct sequence (including all punctuation and capitalization), and proofreading and correcting their work to make sure the right mental image remains (rather than the wrong one). Over time, these skills transfer to students carefully proofreading their own written work in other subjects, which is exactly what we want!  Heart of Dakota’s guides include plans to help you implement Charlotte Mason’s studied dictation methods successfully in your homeschooling, and that’s “More Than a Charlotte Mason Moment” to enjoy!!!

In Christ,
Julie

 

 

Is your child new to independence in school?

Teaching Tip: 

Is your child new to independence in school?

Do you have a child doing Preparing Hearts or Creation to Christ on up who is new to “independence” in school? If so, here is a helpful tip for you! Have your child read the instructions in any “I” box out loud to you prior to beginning the box.

Why is it helpful to have students read aloud the directions in the “independent” boxes of plans?

When kiddos read aloud the directions first, they often have a better idea of what is coming. This makes them less likely to miss steps when performing the “I” box. It can take extra time to have the child read aloud the box first. But, it will save you time later, because the child will know more clearly what to do. If needed, you can also discuss the directions right after the child has read them aloud.

When can you phase out this “reading aloud” step?

The reading aloud step can be phased out as the child gains confidence in reading and following written directions. It helps “train” the child to read the directions through before beginning the box. Try this tip and see if it helps your child! This extra step has really helped our boys!

Blessings,
Carrie

Try the repeating method for “Rhymes in Motion”

Teaching Tip:

Do you have a child doing Little Hands to Heaven or Little Hearts for His Glory?

If you have kiddos doing either Little Hands to Heaven or Little Hearts for His Glory, today’s teaching tip is for you! It’s a simple tip, but one that makes the “Rhymes in Motion” go more smoothly with your little ones!

What is one helpful tip when you begin a new “Rhymes in Motion?”

Here is one helpful tip for beginning a new “Rhymes in Motion.” Say the rhyme and do the motions one line at a time, with your child repeating each line right after you.

What does the repeating method look like on Day 1 of the rhyme?

For example, on Day 1 of the rhyme, you will say and perform line one of the rhyme. Then, your child will repeat line one with the motions. Next, you will move on to line two, saying and demonstrating the line. Then, your child will repeat line two with the motions. Continue on through the rhyme this way to make sure your child is getting the words and motions.

How does the repeating method differ on Day 2?

At our house, we usually continue to use the repeating method on the second day too. However, at the end of the rhyme on day two, we also do the whole rhyme once more in unison.

What are the benefits of doing the rhymes this way?

Usually after two days of repeating each line after you, kiddos are more sure of the words and motions. Then, they are ready to do the rhyme in unison with you in the coming days. The repeating method is also great for making sure your child is participating and has the words down! Try this method at the beginning of a new rhyme and see what you think!

Blessings,
Carrie

PS: For more information on how “Rhymes in Motion” help kids’ skills develop, check out this blog article here:

What are the benefits of the Rhymes in Motion?

Teamwork Carries the Day!

Heart of Dakota Tidbit:

Teamwork Carries the Day!

Did you know that Carrie and Julie (Carrie’s sister and editor) shared one public school teaching position prior to coming home to teach their own children? They did this by teaching 2 days one week and 3 days the next week. Together, they were allowed to “loop” a 3rd grade class by following them up to 4th grade; this enabled them to stay with the same group of children for 2 years. This may be a common practice these days, but 15 years ago this was quite a novel approach to teaching elementary children (in South Dakota anyway . . .)

Even though their public school days are behind them, Carrie and Julie’s teamwork days are far from over! Nowadays, they are privileged to continue working together to help you, our valued HOD customers! 😀

Have a great weekend!

PS: To see why we think homeschooling provides a “looping” education at its best, have a look at this blog article below!

Why homeschool? A Multi-age, Multilevel, and Looping Opportunity

Invite Charlotte Mason’s Teaching Methods into Your Own Home with Heart of Dakota

More Than a Charlotte Mason Moment

Invite Charlotte Mason into your own home with Heart of Dakota!

At Heart of Dakota we ‘met’ Charlotte Mason more than several decades ago when Carrie began homeschooling her oldest son. The more we researched and practiced Charlotte Mason’s teaching methods in our own homes, the more we became convinced her methods deserved to be brought to life in other homes as well. Her breakthrough educational philosophy was just too good not to share! And so began Carrie’s 20-year journey of writing Heart of Dakota’s guides! With a dedication to bringing Charlotte Mason’s teaching methods to life, Carrie created Heart of Dakota’s guides so you too can ‘meet’ her in a very doable, inspirational way!  At Heart of Dakota, we help you invite Charlotte Mason into your own home, so you too can say, “Education is an Atmosphere, a Discipline, a Life.” (Charlotte Mason)

Meeting Ms. Mason in Heart of Dakota’s Guides

Charlotte Mason’s key teaching methods come to life in Heart of Dakota’s guides. Each day you and your children use Heart of Dakota, you will be meeting Ms. Mason and inviting her into your homeschooling with easy-to-use daily plans. Step-by-step, year after year, from guide to guide, Heart of Dakota’s plans introduce your children to Charlotte Mason’s key educational principles and ideas. Little by little, children learn to love literature, love the Lord, and love their learning, just as Charlotte Mason intended.  So, just how will you be inviting Charlotte Mason into your home with Heart of Dakota? Let us show you how as we describe each facet of her educational philosophy and how it is brought to life in Heart of Dakota!

Living Books 

You cannot ‘meet’ Charlotte Mason if you do not use living books. Charlotte Mason had a passion for literature that Carrie shares! With the utmost care and loving research, Carrie carefully chooses living books for each and every subject area.  Like Charlotte Mason, Carrie’s living book choices are narratively written in a conversational way by an author who is passionate about what he or she has written. “Living” books make learning ‘come alive.’ They are the opposite of encyclopedias and textbooks, which are often written in a less than conversational way by a team of people who more than likely are not all that passionate about what they are writing.  In contrast, living books pull you into a subject and make you want to read more. They are the books you cannot put down!

In Heart of Dakota, your children will enjoy living books each and every day in a way that will make them want to read more. Living books light a passion for reading in our children, and Heart of Dakota keeps that passion for learning with literature alive year after year!  Join us in our next “More Than a Charlotte Mason Moment” series, as we describe more key principles of Charlotte Mason’s teaching methods and how they are incorporated into Heart of Dakota!

In Christ,

Julie