Share what is best about your homeschooling days with your husband!

From Our House to Yours

Share what is best about your homeschooling days with your husband!

So you’ve decided to homeschool, and you’re starting your first year! Congratulations – how exciting! Though there are many feelings surrounding embarking on this homeschool journey, often times, we as moms might be more excited about homeschooling than our husbands. Sometimes the opposite is true, but more often than not, we as moms can be more sure of homeschooling at the start than our husbands.  I think our husbands are worried about either our children or about us. They can feel like our children might not get the education they need, or they can feel like we might stop giving our husbands the attention they need. Both our valid concerns! Likewise, we can feel like we have to prove to our husbands that homeschooling is a success. So, what’s the answer? Well, it’s simple! You can start by sharing what is best about your day with your husband!

Your husband’s view of how your homeschooling days are going is based on what you share!

All your husband knows is what you tell him. If you are trying to show homeschooling is a positive thing in your home, be sure to share what is positive about it! If your husband comes home from work and the first thing you do is share the negatives about the day, he will assume your entire homeschool day was probably negative. In contrast, if your husband comes home from work and the first thing you do is share the positives of the day, he will assume your homeschool day was probably positive. Every homeschool day will have positives and negatives. Being mothers of children, we know every day has positives and negatives – regardless if we homeschool or not. However, your husband’s view of how your homeschooling days are going will be a direct result of what you share. So, be sure to share wisely!

Look to the Bible for inspiration!

As the Bible says in Philippians 4:8, Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.

When we dwell or think on what is positive, we naturally share what is positive with others. In contrast, when we dwell or think on what is negative, we naturally share what is negative with others. It is impossible to be a positive person if all we have is negative thoughts. So, the simple answer to helping our husbands see that homeschooling is truly amazing is to share what was positive about our day! Maybe Johnny spilled red juice on the carpet, but maybe Johnny also spelled all of his spelling words right too.  Maybe Amy mixed up her math facts, but maybe Amy also made a beautiful history project! Every day has positives and negatives. We need not paint a perfect picture for our husbands, but we also need not be Debbie Downers. If you want your husband to think homeschooling is a positive thing in your life – be positive! Look in the mirror – you are the greatest influence on your husband’s impression of homeschooling! So, take care to share the positives!

In Christ,

Julie

Is your glass half-empty or half-full?

Heart of Dakota Life

Is your glass half-empty or half-full?

Glass half-full people choose to look at the sunny side of life. These people would be considered optimists because they expect good things to happen. In contrast, glass half-empty people choose to look at the darker side of life. These people would be considered pessimists because they expect bad things to happen. The idea here is that two different people can look at the same glass but see two totally different things. The optimist sees the glass as half-full, focusing on the drink that is still there to be enjoyed; while the pessimist sees the glass as half-empty, focusing on the drink that is gone. In homeschooling, would you say your glass is half-empty, or half-full? If you’re not sure, ask yourself these telltale questions!

When your husband asks how your day went, what do you say?

Your husband walks through the door at the end of his work day and asks how your day went. What do you typically say? Every day has its ups and downs. Some of it will be good, and some of it will be bad. However, a glass half-empty person will lead with the negative; a glass half-full person will lead with the positive. In fact, a glass half-full person may never share the negative at all! This doesn’t mean nothing bad happened; it just means the glass half-full person is choosing not to focus on the bad. If your husband thinks your homeschooling is going poorly, it could simply be because the only things you are sharing with him are the ‘half-empty glass’ things.

When you have a chance to post on homeschool forums, what do you say?

You have a free moment to post something about homeschooling on one of the numerous media outlets available. What do you typically say? Every poster has good and bad things happening in homeschooling on a daily basis. However, a glass half-empty person will readily share the negative; a glass half-full person will readily share the positive. Both may have a question; both may need help. However, the glass half-empty person will word things in the worst possible way, with the bleakest outlook imaginable. The glass half-full person will word things in the best possible way, with anticipation of being able to successfully answer the question or get the help that is needed. If you were to look up your past posts, what would you find? Words are powerful. Glass half-full people know that, and they choose what they say wisely.

If your children were asked how you feel about homeschooling them, what would they say?

Your children are with you day in and day out in homeschooling. You are often their only teacher. If your children were asked how you feel about homeschooling them, what would they say? Sure, they might say it’s stressful and busy at times. But, would they also say they know -most days – you do love to homeschool them? That though everything is not perfect, you still are thankful to be homeschooling them? That though it is hard, you wouldn’t change it because you believe in what you do? If so, you are probably a half-glass full person. Or, would they say you don’t like to homeschool, you can wait for the day to be over, and you are constantly in a bad mood ready to snap at any given moment? If so, you are probably a half-glass empty person.

What can you do if you want to be a half-full glass person, but are instead a half-empty glass person?

If you long to be a half-full glass person, but instead find you are a half-empty glass person, there are things you can do! For example, to be a half-full glass person, I hang completed homeschool projects on the fridge or set them out on a table. When my husband comes home, I point out the projects and tell him all about them. To be a half-full glass person on homeschool forums, I try to be more encouraging than discouraging. I look for the good and share it, and in return, I feel good about homeschooling myself.  To be a half-full glass person in homeschooling my children, I make it a point to tell them often I love being able to homeschool them, that I am proud of them, that they are good students, and that I love being their teacher. Half-full glass people are happier. Try it! You’ll see!

In Christ,

Julie