Let the mother go out to play!

A Charlotte Mason Moment: 

“Let the mother go out to play! If she would only have courage to let everything go when life becomes too tense, and just take a day, or half a day, out in the fields, or with a favorite book, or in a picture gallery looking long and well at just two or three pictures, or in bed (without the children), life would go on far more happily for both children and parents.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 3, p. 33-34)

The habit of attention is of supreme importance

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

“To explain why this habit [Attention] is of such supreme importance, we must consider the operation of one or two of the laws of thought. But just recall, in the meantime, the fixity of attention with which the trained professional man – the lawyer, the doctor, the man of letters – listens to a roundabout story, throws out the padding, seizes the facts, sees the bearing of every circumstance, and puts the case with new clearness and method; and contrast this with the wandering eye and random replies of the uneducated; – and you see that to differentiate people according to their power of attention is to employ a legitimate test.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 1, p. 137)

The Habit of Attention

Reflection, the ruminating power which is so strongly developed in children

A Charlotte Mason Moment: 

“Reflection, the ruminating power which is so strongly developed in children and is somehow lost with much besides of the precious cargo they bring with them into the world. There is nothing sadder than the way we allow intellectual impressions to pass over the surface of our minds, without any effort to retain or assimilate.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 3, p. 120)

It is not advisable to answer children categorically when they want to know the why for every command…

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

“It is not advisable to answer children categorically when they want to know the why for every command, but wise parents steer a middle course. They are careful to form habits upon which the routine of life runs easily, and, when the exceptional event requires a new regulation, they may make casual mention of their reasons for having so and so done; or, if this is not convenient and the case is a trying one, they give the children the reason for all obedience – ‘for this is right’. In a word, authority avoids, so far as may be, giving cause of offence.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Mason Vol. 3, p. 22)

The child’s zeal must be stimulated

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

“The child must not be allowed to get into the mood in which he says, ‘Oh, I am so tired ‘of sums’, or ‘of history’. His zeal must be stimulated; there must always be a pleasing vista before him; and steady, untiring application to work should be held up as honourable, [sic] while fitful, flagging attention and effort are scouted.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Mason Vol. 1, pp. 149,150)