No separation between the intellectual and spiritual

A Charlotte Mason Moment: 

We allow no separation to grow up between the intellectual and ‘spiritual’ life of children, but teach them that the Divine Spirit has constant access to their spirits, and is their Continual Helper in all the interests, duties and joys of life.

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 6; Preface to the ‘Home Education’ Series)

Principles guide how students see ideas

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

“Therefore, children should be taught, as they become mature enough to understand such teaching, that the chief responsibility which rests on them as persons is the acceptance or rejection of ideas. To help them in this choice we give them principles of conduct, and a wide range of the knowledge fitted to them. These principles should save children from some of the loose thinking and heedless action which cause most of us to live at a lower level than we need.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 6; Preface to the ‘Home Education’ Series)

Single readings help build retention

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

A single reading is insisted on, because children have naturally great power of attention; but this force is dissipated by the re-reading of passages, and also, by questioning, summarizing and the like.

Acting upon these and some other points in the behavior of mind, we find that the educability of children is enormously greater than has hitherto been supposed, and is but little dependent on such circumstances as heredity and environment.

Nor is the accuracy of this statement limited to clever children or to children of the educated classes: thousands of children in Elementary Schools respond freely to this method, which is based on the behavior of mind.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 6; Preface to the ‘Home Education’ Series)

Knowledge is not assimilated until it is reproduced

A Charlotte Mason Moment: 

As knowledge is not assimilated until it is reproduced, children should ‘tell back’ after a single reading or hearing: or should write on some part of what they have read.

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 6; Preface to the ‘Home Education’ Series)

Three points to consider in education

A Charlotte Mason Moment: 

“In devising a SYLLABUS for a normal child, of whatever social class, three points must be considered:

(a) He requires much knowledge, for the mind needs sufficient food as much as does the body.

(b) The knowledge should be various, for sameness in mental diet does not create appetite. [i.e., curiosity]

(c) Knowledge should be communicated in well-chosen language, because his attention responds naturally to what is conveyed in literary form. 

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 6; Preface to the ‘Home Education’ Series)