The “act of knowing”

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

“As we have already urged, there is but one right way, that is, children must do the work for themselves. They must read the given pages and tell what they have read, they must perform, that is, what we may call the ‘act of knowing’. We are all aware, alas, what a monstrous quantity of printed matter has gone into the dustbin of our memories, because we have failed to perform that quite natural and spontaneous ‘act of knowing,’ as easy to a child as breathing and, if we would believe it, comparatively easy to ourselves. The reward is two-fold: no intellectual habit is so valuable as that of attention; it is a mere habit but it is also the hallmark of an educated person.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 6, p. 99)

Thou, God, seest me

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

‘Thou, God, seest me.’ That thought will come home to them, so that they will not be able to make themselves unclean by even a thought or a word. They will turn away their eyes from beholding evil; they will not allow themselves to read, or hear, or say a word that should cause impure thoughts.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 4, p. 22)

The generous man will have friends of widely different types

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

The generous man will have friends of widely different types, because he is able to give large entertainment to men of many minds, and to meet them upon many points.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 4, p. 105)

Generosity is a saving grace

A Charlotte Mason Moment:

“Generosity is also a saving grace; for the generous man escapes a thousand small perplexities, worries, and annoys; he walks serene in a large room. There are so many great things to care about that he has no mind and no time for the small frettings of life; his concerns are indeed great, for what concerns man concerns him.”

(Home Education by Charlotte M. Vol. 4, p. 105)