Give your students two desirable choices.

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Teaching Tip:

Encourage your students to keep a positive attitude.

As we near the end of our school year, my kiddos need extra encouragement to keep a positive attitude! It is possible that your students need encouragement too! Today, I’ll share a quick tip that works well to encourage students of all ages to cheerfully comply or obey.

Give your students two desirable choices.

To avoid power struggles, it helps to give students two choices (both of which are desirable to you). This means that while the child gets the power to choose, you also retain power because either choice is acceptable to you.

The choices strategy works especially well for young children.

This strategy works for kiddos of all ages but can be used repeatedly with little ones (all throughout the day). Here are some examples of providing two desirable choices to little ones.

At naptime you can say, “Would you like to walk up the stairs, or do you want me to carry you?” This diverts the child from the issue of not wanting to go to nap. Instead, your child will be focused on the choice of whether to walk or be carried. The napping is a foregone conclusion.

Or, for a child who is always asking for juice, you can say, “Do you want milk or water with your lunch?” This rules out other beverages and focuses on what you will accept as choices.

The choices strategy also works with older children.

With older children, you can ask, “Would you like to do math or science first?” For a child who does not like one of those two subjects, the choice allows them to delay the unloved subject. Then, when the unloved subject arrives, they know they chose for it to be in that order.

The choices strategy also works well with mature students.

For even older students, you can ask, “What is the most important thing you wish to do today during your free time?” Then, as a parent you can be sure to get that one thing in that day. This forces the child to prioritize and choose what is most important. It also helps the child realize that you worked to be sure that he/she got in what he valued that day.

Try giving your students limited choices.

Try giving your students limited choices, and see whether you notice a change. Hopefully, you’ll notice a more positive attitude which will help end your year on a positive note!

Blessings,
Carrie

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2 thoughts on “Give your students two desirable choices.”

  1. I enjoy reading your suggestions because they are attainable and love filled. Do you suppose I appreciate your writings because I respect and love you? Keep up the good work.

    1. Oh, thank you, Miriam! Attainable is so important, isn’t it? Love filled is too. You had these two goals with the children you taught as well. Thank you so much for the encouragement! Thank you also for being a wonderful friend to our mother!

      Love,
      Carrie and Julie

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