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The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 7:42 am
by DHT1999
Can anyone point me to any threads that give us a glimpse into what may be in the guide that Carrie is writing for after RtR? I have tried to do a search but couldn't come up with anything. I really need to know if this program will be something that I could do with a 9th grader. I know some areas will need alot of adjusting, but I am hoping it may work. I read on another board that Carrie had shared what a couple of the spine books may be, so I thought it may have come up here recently.

Thanks for any help!!

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 12:07 pm
by basesloaded
There is a little info on the HOD homepage if you click on the scope & sequence link. Here it is for you http://www.heartofdakota.com/scope.php . Hope that helps some :D .

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 6:46 pm
by basesloaded
Actually :D , I think this is what you are looking for. Carrie posted this response to an earlier question ....

Re: Maybe this is a secret... ;-)
by Carrie on Mon Feb 22, 2010 6:41 pm

Ah, Ladies! You don't miss a thing do you! We do have a plan now to add a Geography guide after we complete the four year history cycle, so this will be the third guide in line after RTR. The guide will bridge the threshold into high school for grade 9 and will count for gegraphy credit. We are thinking at this point in time that it will be set up in a similar way to our current guides (CTC/RTR). It will be suitable for those who finish the history cycle early and need to use it with an 8th grader and also be suitable for those who need to use it for 9th grade high school credit in geography.

We are looking to schedule a Bible study as well that will likely count for Bible credit. We will add additional reading material in the geography area to Ellen McHenry's truly excellent Mapping the World with Art. On a sidenote, this decision comes upon the wings of the fact that in its completed stage Ellen's guide is even better than we had originally hoped and will be the main spine for projects and mapping activities.

For additional geography content reading, we are thrilled to have found Synge's Book of Discovery that matches very well with Ellen's Mapping the World with Art. It is linked for you to preview here: http://www.yesterdaysclassics.com/previ ... review.pdf

Here is its description: A Book of Discovery by M. B. Synge
A fascinating account of the world's famous explorers, including the early travelers in ancient times, the discovery of the New World, explorations in Africa and Australia, and the expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic. Many of the explorers tell part of their story in their own words. Amply illustrated with reproductions of early maps and charts, as well as old woodcuts, drawings, paintings, and miniatures. Emphasis is placed on the explorers' 'record of splendid endurance, of hardships bravely borne, of silent toil, of courage and resolution unequalled in the annals of mankind, of self-sacrifice unrivalled and faithful lives laid ungrudgingly down.' Ages 12-18
527 pages $17.95

One other book that is under consideration as part of the geography reading spines is Great Adventures of the Twentieth Century by Ron Tagliapietra (published by BJU). It is linked here: http://www.bjupress.com/product/114116

We will also likely schedule grammar, a writing program, options for literature study, a science option, poetry (either within the lit. study or on its own), and additional readings of biographies and historical fiction to enhance the study. There will be some form of an extension package, and we will make recommendations for math.

We would be looking for the areas of language arts, geography, Bible, science, and math to be high school credit worthy recommendations, depending on your state's requirements of course. As always, you would be able to substitute your own favorites easily in the language arts, math, and science areas.

Blessings,
Carrie

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 5:34 am
by Lynnw
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=640&hilit=poor+richard

Donna, the above linked thread is a older discussion of beefing up Bigger for a student older than the extensions. If you scroll down to Carrie's post, she has added an update about some of the resources to be used in the next guide so that people will know to avoid using those.

Hope that helps.
Lynn

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 7:45 am
by jg_puppy
I didn't start this thread, but I have been wondering about the next guides. I am planning on starting CTC next year and can't wait.

Janet

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 8:25 am
by basesloaded
:D Even more Info from another area on the message board viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1655

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:58 am
by my3sons
The new guide is a work in progress, and I know Carrie is going to be revealing first here on the board as different parts of it come together. I am excited as well! :D By being on the HOD Board, you are definitely the best place for being the first to learn about what is to come. :wink:
In Christ,
Julie

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 2:24 pm
by DHT1999
Thanks everyone! I knew Carrie was still writing and there wouldn't be alot revealed at this point but I had read on another board that two of the spine books had been mentioned here, so I thought there may be a few more tidbits floating around! I'll check back as time progresses! I am anxious to find out if this guide will be appropriate for a 9th grader as I'd really love for that to be the case!!

Blessings,
Donna T.

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 5:06 pm
by Tree House Academy
My older son will be doing RTR in 7th grade, the next guide in 8th grade, and the final 4-year history cycle guide in 9th grade. Should he do the geography one in 10th grade or will it not be written for kids that old?

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 8:47 pm
by jg_puppy

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:08 pm
by Carrie
Ladies,

You have been so patient in asking about the new guide, and I am thrilled to be able to start giving you some wonderful sneak peaks into it! We are still pondering its exact title, so for now we'll just call it the guide after RTR. :wink:

We have the spines for history almost completely in place at this point and are excited about the line-up. I say "almost completely" as sometimes as the writing progresses further we run across a needed change that we didn't foresee at first. So, here goes... for the history spines: 8)

George Washington's World by Genevieve Foster (My hands-down favorite of the Foster books! :D)
History Lives: Hearts and Hands by Mindy and Brandon Withrow (with several chapters omitted for content) (Link: http://www.historylivesseries.com/?page_id=7 )
The Story of Napolean by H. E. Marshall (Link: http://www.yesterdaysclassics.com/previ ... review.pdf )
The Growth of the British Empire by M.B. Synge (Link: http://www.yesterdaysclassics.com/previ ... review.pdf )
The Story of the Great Republic by H.A. Guerber (Link: http://www.nothingnewpress.com/guerber/ ... tents.html )

Description of George Washington's World from the publisher: :D
The period measured by the life of George Washington—1732 to 1799 —was one of revolution and change in many parts of the world as Enlightenment thinking took hold in the minds of men. When George was a young man, Benjamin Franklin was the most well-known American, Louis XV was on the throne of France, and George II was king of England. Father Junipero Serra had just arrived in Mexico to work with the Panes Indians. Mozart and Bach were writing their immortal music and Voltaire warred with his pen against Ignorance, Injustice and Superstition. The young nobleman Lafayette watched the feisty American colonies with fascinated interest as they stood up to Mother England when she sought to tax them unfairly. James Cook was sent by the Royal Society of London to Tahiti where their team of astronomers might observe a total eclipse of the sun and thereby accurately measure the distance between the earth and the sun. These are just a few of the wonderful narratives explored by Foster in her Newbery Honor Book of 1940. Prolifically illustrated with intriguing line drawings and detailed timelines, Foster's telling of the life story of George Washington does justice to the man it celebrates.

Both George Washington's World by Foster and The Story of the Great Republic were series selected for inclusion in Cathy Duffy's Top 100 Curriculum Picks. :D

If you haven't already seen the discussion on the signers of the Declaration of Independence, I'll link it here as another sneak peek into the new guide to come after RTR! :wink: Link: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7573

Blessings,
Carrie

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:24 pm
by deltagal
Thank you Carrie for quenching our thirst! :D It's always good to know "what's cooking?!" And it sure looks good...

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:19 pm
by aprilmd
We are on week 7 of RTR and loving it.
Now you just made me excited for next year. :D :D

Thank you!

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:34 pm
by Tree House Academy
That sounds wonderful, Carrie. The Age of Reason/Enlightenment - is that the correct time period? If so, my son will absolutely LOVE this. He has told me he wants to be an "inventor" someday. We shall see! LOL

Re: The NEXT guide

PostPosted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 1:22 pm
by michmom2
So great to have a "preview"! Can't wait for the rest of the story!